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Last updated on Nov 19, 2019

The Best Exercise Bikes

We cycled hundreds of miles to find the best spin and recumbent bikes ​
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How We Found the Best Exercise Bikes

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57 bikes considered

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13 bikes tested in-house

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5 top picks

The Best Exercise Bikes

Finding the right exercise bike depends on a lot of things including your body, preferences, and fitness goals. This is before we even get into the diversity of stationary bikes and the unique ride and exercise benefits. Luckily, we’ve taken the time to eliminate some of the guesswork by exploring two of the most popular styles — recumbent and spin — to find you the best models on the market.

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The 5 Best Exercise Bikes

    The Best Exercise Bikes: Summed Up

    Best for Flywheel Weight Max User Weight Warranty
    Bladez Echelon Best Spin Bike 40 lbs. 275 lbs. 1 year parts
    1 year labor
    Diamondback 510lc Best Spin Bike Programming 32 lbs. 300 lbs. 3 years parts
    1 year labor
    ProForm 740ES Best Recumbent Bike 20 lbs. 350 lbs. 2 years parts
    1 year labor
    NordicTrack VR25 Best Recumbent Upgrade 25 lbs. 350 lbs. 2 years parts
    1 year labor
    Nautilus 616 Best Budget Recumbent 30 lbs. 300 lbs. 5 years parts
    2 years labor

    Bladez Echelon

    Best Basic Spin Bike
    Bladez

    Bladez Echelon

    Pros

    Compact and powerful
    Robust engineering
    Great price

    Cons

    No programming

    Why we chose it

    Compact and powerful

    For a pure spin experience — just you and the machine — we love the Bladez Echelon. Quiet, consistent rotation and sensitive knob resistance helped us get in a quality ride every time. Whether you’re looking for a space saver exercise bike (a small exercise bike for apartment use) or a distraction-free workout (streamlined tech), this small and mighty bike delivers.

    Robust engineering

    While the straightforward display is hardly more than a stopwatch, the engineering of the bike itself is impressive. The flywheel rotates with a peppy, forward-urging motion that never feels bouncy, and in fact can reach some of the heartiest levels of resistance we experienced out of all the spin models. Despite the Echelon’s overall light body weight, there’s no shaking or sound as you pedal. We felt secure enough to freely amp up intensity and ride out of the saddle.

    Great price

    If there’s anything more impressive than the Bladez Echelon’s solid construction, it’s the attractive pricing. Coming in at under $360, this exceptional bike costs less than half the price of other bikes that can’t compare in ride feel. It also excels in adjustability — the Echelon’s seat and handle had a wider customization range than any other bike we tested.

    Points to consider

    No programming

    Like most spin bikes, the Echelon uses a battery-operated display that can’t control intensity and doesn’t offer workout programs. If you need workout programs and metrics to keep you motivated, check out the Diamondback. Some testers, however, found the simple consoles less distracting than higher-tech versions, making it easier to focus on the workout. The Echelon’s console may be bare bones but offers everything you actually need — performance stats like calories burned, time, distance, and RPMs.

    Diamondback Fitness 510Ic Indoor Cycle

    Best Spin Bike Programming
    Diamondback

    Diamondback Fitness 510Ic Indoor Cycle

    Pros

    Exceptional tech
    Smooth ride

    Cons

    Reduced adjustability range

    Why we chose it

    Exceptional tech

    After fiddling with all manner of knobs and screws on other spin bikes, we were relieved to encounter the sophisticated, console-equipped DiamondBack 510Ic. If you appreciate the full-service programming and screen quality of gym equipment, you will feel more at home on this spin bike than any other we tested. The 510Ic centralizes resistance adjustments, programming, and performance stats in one slim display — about the size of a credit card reader. (Diamondback’s level-up, the 910Ic, is nearly identical in structure and tech, with slight tweaks to flywheel weight and programming depth that we didn’t find impactful enough to rationalize the $200 upcharge.)

    Smooth ride

    Our ride experience on the 510Ic was luxuriously smooth and steady. The heavier body of the Diamondback 510Ic means it sits solidly on the floor, holding you secure as you hit higher intensities or stand to pedal. And thanks to the variety of programming, we were confident we could find a workout for any fitness goal.

    Points to consider

    Reduced adjustability range

    When it comes to adjustability, the DiamondBack doesn’t have quite the same extension range as the Bladez. That said, the seat can ratchet up higher, making it a better fit for users with extra long legs. We also appreciated the numbered and lettered adjustment levels on this bike — a Diamondback feature that was sorely missing on most other spin bikes. Rather than have to rediscover your perfect placement every time someone else goes for a ride, you can just remember that your seat sits at “G” and quickly slide it into place.

    ProForm 740 ES

    Best Recumbent Bike
    ProForm

    ProForm 740 ES

    Pros

    Sleek and comfortable
    Smart programming
    Excellent adjustability

    Cons

    Heavy

    Why we chose it

    Sleek and comfortable

    The ProForm 740 outperformed what we expected of a recumbent, improving on every standard feature and answering to every need. We loved the sleek, sculpted design, and appreciated how easy ProForm makes it to get comfortable — the seat cradles without confining, the pedal rotation remains effortless even as our effort increased. Of all the recumbents we tested, the ProForm struck this delicate set of balances best.

    Smart programming

    The technology of the ProForm 740 is both extensive and immediately usable. The console is a classic iFit creation (the fitness tech company created by ProForm and NordicTrack’s parent entity, ICON Fitness). Its high-quality, 7-inch touchscreen and bold icons depicting program categories makes for an intuitive interface that anyone will feel confident navigating.

    Excellent adjustability

    The ProForm won lots of points for adjustability. Simply lift up on the seat adjustment lever and the seat will easily move when you push it. Other bikes immediately started inching (or flying) down the shaft as soon as we moved the lever, which was sometimes a startling experience. We also enjoyed the innovation in the bike’s clever, tilting console. Twist the knob at the console base and it nods up and down, allowing you to tailor the positioning to your seated height. Since the majority of user interaction with the console takes place through the touchscreen, having it within easy reach and at a proper angle for clear sight is vital.

    Points to consider

    Heavy

    Like most recumbent bikes, the ProForm is too heavy and bulky to be easily maneuvered. This model will serve you best if you can dedicate space to its permanent storage, rather than attempting to wheel it out of sight at the end of every workout. If storability is vital, look to a spin bike like the Echelon.

    NordicTrack VR25

    Best Recumbent Upgrade
    NordicTrack

    NordicTrack VR25

    Pros

    Expanded in every sense
    Convenient amenities

    Cons

    Tall console height

    Why we chose it

    Expanded in every sense

    NordicTrack and ProForm equipment are produced by the same manufacturer, so it’s no surprise that a lot of our favorite ProForm features show up on the NordicTrack. The two bikes are essentially equivalent, but the NordicTrack VR25 is bigger, more expensive, and ideal for anyone who wants a more luxurious bike or needs the extra leg room. This bike combines sophisticated technology (replete programming, beautifully clear touchscreen, intelligently organized performance stats) with ergonomic design. We noted how the seat feels both comfortable and secure: You can pedal with high intensity and stay supported and centered — no bouncing or sliding into a slump.

    Convenient amenities

    Most recumbents place water bottle holder and heart rate sensors near the console: Typically, the bottle holder fixes onto the console stem, while the heart rate sensors are inlaid in the handlebars that curve on either side of the display, forcing you to lean forward and reach if you want to grab your water or check your heart rate. The ProForm 740 allows you bring these amenities into reach by manipulating the placement of the console; NordicTrack VR25 solves the issue another way. It stores both holder and heart rate handles at hip-level, allowing you to hydrate and check exertion without breaking cadence or even shifting out of your seat.

    Points to consider

    Tall console height

    The lack of a pivoting console is a point lost for NordicTrack. It isn’t suitable for users of any height. In overall feel, the NordicTrack is roomier than the ProForm, but that breathing room comes from the fact the console sits 5 inches higher and 5 inches farther forward. If you need or want that extra space, you will enjoy NordicTrack’s dimensions. But shorter users may find themselves squinting to see the touchscreen and straining to hit buttons.

    Nautilus 616

    Best Budget Recumbent
    Nautilus

    Nautilus 616

    Pros

    Simple, efficient tech
    Great quality for the price

    Cons

    Tricky adjustments
    Idiosyncratic metrics

    Why we chose it

    Simple, efficient tech

    The Nautilus R616 is a clean-cut machine. Smaller and more streamlined than our fully-loaded top picks, it still provides enough programming to answer most people’s wants. Rather than an of-the-minute, iFit-equipped console, Nautilus’s offers rows of actual buttons and a traditional blue LCD screen, with bar charts mapping progress. We found the whole setup user-friendly (though admittedly old-school) and were impressed with its satisfying range of preloaded workouts and detailed performance stats. Nautilus wisely locates the heart sensors themselves on the seat-side handles — allowing you to measure heart rate from a comfortable position.

    Great quality for the price

    The Nautilus R616 has its quirks, but also its pleasant qualities. During testing, we logged enjoyable miles thanks to smooth, substantial resistance created by the heavy flywheel. This ride feel, plus an easily portable body and an amazing five-year parts warranty, prove the quality of this bargain-priced pick.

    Points to consider

    Tricky adjustments

    The ergonomics aren’t great — due in large part to the stiff seat back and not-so-cushiony cushion. The main issue: The seat adjustment has a steeper learning curve here than on the other models. When you open the lever, the seat rocks side to side and slides down the bar, making adjustments more taxing. We got the hang of it after a couple clumsy attempts.

    Idiosyncratic metrics

    Unlike ProForm and NordicTrack, the heart rate sensors don’t report in raw numbers (145 BPM, for example) but instead as a percentage. A flashing bar chart shows what percentage of your max heart rate you’re hitting (like 65%) and where that puts you on the spectrum from Warm-Up to Fat Burn to Aerobic to Anaerobic. This seemed more like a guesstimate than a useful statistic, but the truth is that the heart rate provided by any exercise equipment is a guesstimate. Even on the nicest, most luxurious machines we’ve tested, we’ve noted that our heart rate jumps from low to high when we know we haven’t yet exerted ourselves. That said, we still prefer a number if only to help track our fitness level over time.

    How We Chose the Best Exercise Bikes

    Top manufacturers

    We looked at all the spin and recumbent bikes made by Bladez, Diamondback, Keiser, Nautilus, NordicTrack, Peloton, ProForm, Schwinn, Spinning, and Sunny Health — the most reputable companies in the exercise bike market. Our starting list of 57 bikes included a vast range of engineering choices, technology uses, and price points. To discover what elements make some bikes better than others, we consulted physiotherapy and fitness experts and dug into sports medicine data. Then we compared these learnings to the machines’ stats.

    Flywheel weight

    Resistance mechanisms recreate the intensity of outdoor cycling, caused by wind, incline, and changing terrain. There are two exercise bike resistance systems, and weighted flywheels are at the core of each. One relies on a heavy flywheel alone, the other simulates weight by pulling on the metal flywheel with magnets.

    Spin

    According to the physical therapist and the fitness trainer we talked to, it’s the low-tech, weight-only option that provides the better, tougher workout. We made that our top priority for fitness-focused spin bikes. The basic resistance type used in spin bikes is generated by a flywheel weighing anywhere up to 50 pounds. The resistance — and the ride feel — is only as great as the flywheel is heavy. The flywheel stores rotational energy, but the faster you go, the harder it is to keep pedaling at that speed. To increase resistance, direct contact braking tightens a felt pad brake against the flywheel, generating friction. For spin bikes, we only considered models with heavy flywheels weighing 30 pounds or more.

    Recumbent

    For recumbent bikes, we prioritized ride smoothness over intensity. We looked to ECB resistance, but still wanted the substantial ride quality that a weighty flywheel provides. Magnetic braking requires electricity, and is the resistance type typically found in recumbent and upright bikes. (These styles also use electricity to power automatic resistance leveling and programmed workouts). Because ECB doesn’t require friction to up intensity, mechanical parts remain unstressed and silent, and the ride can be smoother and more consistent. However, because the user isn’t powering their own resistance, workouts are less intense. Since the magnetic power of ECB systems is the primary arbiter of tension, the flywheel can weigh far less, but we still drew the line at a respectable 20 pounds.

    Clean, intuitive controls

    Spin and recumbent bikes couldn’t be more different in terms of programming, but our standards for each were surprisingly similar: Clear, helpful, usable information that improved our workout.

    Spin

    Spin bikes are simple machines — most of them don’t even need to be plugged in. No electricity means adjustments are manual and programming is limited. But we didn’t mind: Fiddling with programs and scrolling between metrics can be a distraction. According to Dr. Mitch Owens of Seattle’s Union Physical Therapy, “Simple works well.” He wrote off the need for extra programming or gadgets in order to get a good ride, suggesting that straightforward spin displays keep you on task. Basic performance feedback is enough — calories, time, distance, RPMs.

    Recumbent

    Recumbent cycling can become a little lacklustre — unlike spinning, there’s no option to change your positioning or take off on impromptu sprints. So we wanted to see a satisfying range of programming, instituting a minimum of 15 resistance levels and 20 preloaded workouts.

    Durability backed by warranty

    We prioritize long warranties for all exercise equipment. You’d be hard-pressed to find a piece of residential-use cardio equipment that didn’t have at least a handful of customer reviews detailing an unexpected breakdown or malfunction during the first year. The better the bike, the less likely it is you’ll be sent the one with a manufacturing flaw, but it’s not unprecedented to find a bad apple in a good bunch.

    Spin bikes tend to have shorter warranties than other styles, topping out at three years for parts and one year for labor. Recumbents, which are typically pricier and more elaborate in their construction, have longer warranties — as many as five years for parts and two years for labor. We came up with midrange requirements for both: A minimum one-year parts warranty for spin bikes, a minimum two-year parts warranty for recumbent.

    Spin bikes with belts

    Spin bikes leave the hard work up to you, but some aspects of a spin workout should still feel effortless. We loved bikes with silky smooth rides, free of grinding sounds and vibrating sensations. We anticipated heavy flywheels would provide that ride, but testing revealed a second arbiter of quality. Our favorite spin bikes employ belts rather than chains to connect the movement of the pedals to the rotation of the flywheel. Of the two drive system types, chain is the cheaper and more old-fashioned. And while chain can last practically forever with regular tightening and lubrication, a belt provides a much smoother, quieter ride. The only downside is that you’ll eventually need to replace the belt when it’s stretched out.

    Heavy recumbent bikes

    A heavy flywheel, while palpably important, does not alone create a good recumbent ride. Instead, we preferred bikes with a heavy flywheel and a heavy overall weight. Any bike is only as heavy as its components are substantial, and we deduced that higher-quality, all-metal components in our favorite recumbents were contributing to a more pleasant ride.

    Guide to Exercise Bikes

    How to find the right exercise bike for you

    Choose between spin and recumbent

    The user experience on each bike style is different.

    Spin bikes are best for those…

    • who already have some spinning experience under their belt
    • have a generally high level of fitness
    • prefer to self-direct their workouts

    The exercise bikes used in high-intensity spin classes model their construction after speedy road bikes, and support the physically demanding way cyclists employ them. Spin bikes pitch the rider forward at a 45-degree angle, with curved handles that are on roughly the same plane as the seat. Resistance levels are typically controlled by a knob or lever, but the real intensity comes from how quickly you pedal. As you increase speed, the flywheel begins to store your excess effort, generating a powerful forward momentum. But reaching and maintaining that point of inertia requires a ton of force.

    Recumbent bikes, with their easy-entry design, are best for those…

    • with back injuries
    • mobility issues
    • or who want extensive programming

    With a low, long profile and a bucket seat, recumbent bikes allow the rider to lean against the backrest with legs outstretched at a shallow decline from the hips. While recumbent riding foregoes the core engagement demanded by upright bikes, these bikes do provide greater back support. You don’t have to carry your body weight on top of the pedals, which reduces joint load, while motorized resistance levels recreate the intensity of weight plus terrain. Control intensity and switch between programs using the consoles.

    Watch out for “effective” flywheel weight

    Many manufacturers declare the “effective” flywheel weight (what the resistance feels like with the magnetic ECB system at work) or nothing at all. We rummaged through owner’s manuals and clogged up customer service channels to nail down the correct numbers, but noted that when the flywheel weight was hard to find it usually led to a disappointing number. Takeaway: If the stats are hard to find, the machine probably isn’t great.

    One manufacturer doesn’t excel at all equipment

    Exercise equipment manufacturers sometimes excel in producing one style, but miss the mark on another. One example: The well-known bike brand Diamondback makes a superb (and expensive) spin bike, but a sub par (and still expensive) recumbent bike. The recumbent model we tried, Diamondback 910 Sr, was one of the most comfortable bikes we tested, but we were disappointed with its outdated console and vexing adjustments.

    Adjust your ride to get a symmetrical, injury-free workout

    We talked to physical therapist Dr. Mitch Owens about the ergonomics of cycling, and he had one top priority. “You just need total adjustability.”

    Spin bike handlebars and seats should move up and down, fore and aft. Recumbent styles don’t boast the same four-way range, typically allowing for just leg length changes, but the best make that movement easy while also providing console adjustment. A good rule of thumb on any bike style: The knees should maintain some degree of bend at their fullest extension. For spinning, you want an ample 30 degree bend. On recumbents, straighten out to 10 – 15 degrees.

    Focus on enclosed mechanics

    Try to avoid any exercise bikes with exposed belts or chains. Cheaper, older models can leave these elements out in the open, making it very easy for children or pets to get caught in the moving parts. On average, 12,714 children suffer injuries from home exercise equipment each year – the majority of these being from stationary bikes. Exercise bikes like the Bladez Echelon and the Diamondback Fitness 510Ic Indoor Cycle have covers that enclose these moving parts to help minimize the chance of injury.

    Exercise Bikes FAQ

    More Exercise Equipment Reviews

    We have pedaled and jogged, stretched and strode our way through multiple species of fitness equipment and accessories. We take the hard work out of finding the best in a ton of exercise categories so you can save your energy for the workout.

    About the Authors

    Anne Dennon

    Anne Dennon Home Technology Writer

    Anne has covered home security and home automation for Reviews.com for two years. She's interested in human-computer interaction and tech ethics. She previously worked in education and information literacy.