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Last updated on Nov 21, 2019

The Best Treadmills for Walkers

These belts were made for walking ​
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How We Reviewed The Best Treadmills for Walkers

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2 Months of Testing

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9 Treadmills Tested

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2 Top Picks

The Best Treadmills for Walkers

The best treadmill for walking has a comfortably roomy belt surface, a sturdy frame that doesn’t shake with every step, and an easy-to-read console that lets you hit your stride with minimal button pressing. We tested nine treadmills to see how they felt under our feet and how easy they were to operate. Two of them matched up perfectly with walkers’ needs.

How We Chose the Best Treadmills for Walkers

Research-informed criteria

Our research told us that reliable walking treadmills should meet or exceed certain criteria for size, motor power, and durability. We rounded up the best treadmills we could find that matched our expectations and were rated highly by customers, fitness experts, and online review sites. Here’s what we looked for.

55 x 20-inch belt area

Treadmill decks don’t vary much between models. The treadmill footprint generally sits at around 7 x 3 feet, and roughly three-fourths of that space is taken up by the belt. A good belt size depends on the biomechanics of the user, coupled with their preferred workout style. Runners — or walkers with extra-long legs — may need the belt length to hit 60 inches so they can comfortably extend their legs with every stride. But most walkers will have plenty of room on a belt 55 inches long.

A spacious width, on the other hand, is less about accommodating strides (footfalls don’t generally land outside hip width) and more about avoiding the feeling of constraint. Some budget treadmills have belts as narrow as 18 inches, but we preferred an extra couple of inches for breathing room.

Strong motor

Treadmill motor power is typically measured in continuous horsepower (CHP): the max level of energy the machine can put out over time. The best treadmills have an increased range, as they’re designed with runners in mind. Their engines generate 3 to 3.5 CHP, and luxury options climb above 4 CHP — about twice as much as you need if you’re looking to take a brisk stroll or a jog. While 2 CHP was our minimum, we preferred motors hitting closer to 2.5: Extra power guards against inconsistent performance, especially important if the user weighs above 200 lbs. or plans to keep an intense workout schedule.

Warranties that aren’t measured in days

Short warranties lasting 90 days or fewer serve as a none-too-subtle indication that the machine will fail after a few months of use. Based on customer reviews, most manufacturing flaws tend to show up around the one-year mark. Machines made by reliable companies offer lifetime warranties on the frame and multi-year warranties on everything else, and both of our top picks have warranties that match that expectation.

Programming

If you want a treadmill that does a little more than just start and stop, there are dozens of entertainment and programming options available on new machines to keep your workouts interesting and your playlists fresh. Here are a few we think make for an exceptional workout:

  • Speakers help keep motivation high and avoid headphone tangles.
  • Standard connections like an MP3 input are all but mandatory on exercise equipment. A USB jack allows you to download and upload workout information.
  • Fans, even small ones, do wonders to keep you from feeling overheated while working out.
  • Media shelves are great for holding a tablet or magazine. We especially liked ones that didn’t obscure buttons and displays when we put them to use.
  • WiFi may not seem like a treadmill necessity, but it’s quickly becoming standard. Sync up with your treadmill’s compatible app to connect with extra fitness programming and monitor your progress.

Testing

Before we could recommend the best treadmills, we had to take them for a spin. We brought in a total of nine treadmills for our larger review of the Best Treadmill. From these nine, we pinpointed options that best suited walkers, runners, and those looking for an immersive entertainment experience. To decide the best for walkers, we paid close attention to the stats to ensure walkers are just paying for the size and power that they need. We also prioritized the holistic exercise experience, from belt cushioning and frame construction to programming and controls. Our favorite walking treadmills were affordable, comfortable to walk on, and easy to use. For more details on our testing, visit the main the Best Treadmill.

The Best Treadmills for Walkers

    Best High Tech Treadmill
    ProForm

    ProForm 505 CST

    Pros

    Exceptional tech
    Usable in motion
    Ergonomic

    Cons

    Learning curve

    Why we chose it

    Exceptional tech

    ProForm 505 CST exceeded our expectations in just about every area. It’s a sleek, modern machine with a sturdy build and ergonomic design. We particularly loved the ProForm’s simple, easy-to-understand controls. We found ourselves pressing buttons without needing to decipher their function first; we somehow knew what the symbols meant. While the console is clean and uncluttered, it’s far from basic in appearance: It looks like the treadmill of the future. We were floored by this $600 treadmill’s stats, convenience, and smart design. Plus, its iFit compatibility opens up another level in fitness programming and personal tracking.

    Usable in motion

    The average treadmill console features two vertical rows of speed and incline controls, going up by single-digit integers. ProForm switches this up, setting controls horizontally, meaning that instead of having to jog right up to the console to hit top numbers, you reach forward the same amount whether you’re pressing 2 MPH or 10 MPH. You don’t have to work harder to work out harder.

    505 Console for Treadmill

    Ergonomic

    That smart simplicity carried over into its smooth ergonomics, which made reaching controls and handrails easy. Then we jumped on and hit Start, and found that a ton of those cool design features led directly to a better workout. Despite its exceptionally low price tag (about as little as you can pay for a good treadmill), this machine offered an impressively sturdy ride without any jarring feedback, even when we stepped up our walking pace into a jog. The molded arms curve organically down from the console, providing a greater sense of security than other models we tested, and textured foot rails made us feel secure even when stepping off a fast-moving belt. Don’t be fooled by its price — the 505 CST is sturdy. We couldn’t get the machine to shake even when we gripped the arms and tugged. We were relieved to not have to look at a shaking console for the entirety of our workout, and could instead focus on pushing ourselves up inclines at a steady clip.

    505 CST for Treadmill

    Points to consider

    Learning curve

    Adopting app icon design is not unique to ProForm; similar iterations appear on the Horizon T101. We liked ProForm’s take because it doesn’t double up on symbols and words. The images do what they’re supposed to — simplify meaning. But that could be an obstacle for users who aren’t as familiar with typical treadmill buttons. They also take a little practice to hit in the right spot to get a response, due to their flat dimensions.

    Most Comfortable Walk
    Horizon

    Horizon T101

    Pros

    Traditional controls
    Comfortable design
    features
    Smooth start

    Cons

    Usability ticks

    Why we chose it

    Comfortable design features

    Horizon T101 excelled in a few key areas. It features a shorter, flatter motor cover, which gave us more room to stretch out our legs in the front. That extra space results in a slightly more comfortable walk, which can pay dividends if you have long strides, long legs, or just prefer keeping close to the console. And it comes with a fan. Sure, it’s a small fan, but it does the trick, and the other treadmills in this price range skimped on fans entirely.

    Traditional controls

    If you prefer a classic console, you’ll appreciate the clarity of the Horizon T101’s controls. The Horizon’s console definitely isn’t as sleek as the ProForm’s, but some may find it more user-friendly. We found the Horizon’s buttons were explicitly labeled and their functions responded more quickly. The buttons are conveniently laid out in reach of the user and only need a single poke to take effect — no frantic mid-stride jabbing to adjust speed. We sometimes had to press the ProForm’s keys twice to accomplish an action.

    T101 for Treadmill

    Smooth start

    Another thing we liked about the Horizon was the gentle start to our workouts. Most of the treadmills we tested started at a minimum speed of 1 MPH, which might not sound like much, but it’s a surprising jolt forward, even when you’re expecting it. The Horizon T101 earned points for starting at 0.5 MPH and giving us a more gradual entry into our walks.

    T101 for Treadmill

    Points to consider

    Usability ticks

    Our runner-up bore a lot of similarities to the ProForm, including a smooth-running belt and a substantial frame, but comes at a slightly higher cost – another 50 bucks. For that surcharge, we weren’t too pleased with the handful of usability bugs we had a hard time getting past — like a weirdly high-pitched default volume setting and a tendency to stop the belt if you tried to change programs mid-workout. The belt was also noticeably thin compared to the ProForm’s, which led to a less cushioned walk. But if the ProForm looks a little too Space Age for you, the Horizon T101 offers a more obvious console and a solid walking experience.

    How to Find the Right Treadmill for Home Use

    Reflect on your exercise style

    How you exercise tells you a lot about what kind of treadmill you should buy.

    • Running places high impact on the machine, so runners need to seek out power and stability as top priorities.
    • Walking strains the machine considerably less, so mid-range stats (and prices) are more than enough to meet the demand.

    Shop for your style

    If your primary form of exercise is walking, you can get all the power and programming you need out of a treadmill without shelling out several thousand dollars. While those more expensive models offer greater size and motor power, those things aren’t necessary for a great walking treadmill. In fact, less power means less expense, smaller dimensions, and better storability.

    Decide on your tech needs

    If you like to zone out to music or a favorite TV show while you walk, then advanced programming within the treadmill itself won’t be as important to you. However, if you find your best workouts happen when you can play with different workout settings, then it might be worth it to pay for a treadmill with more robust tech capabilities.

    Treadmill Walking FAQ

    Is it easier walking on a treadmill than walking outside?

    In a word, yes. But just because you omit wind resistance and level changes when you walk indoors doesn’t mean you can’t recreate them with your treadmill. Take advantage of the incline function in order to work out with more of the resistance you find in an outdoor environment.

    Is running a lot better for you than walking?

    It’s true that running challenges your muscles and heart in a way that mid-paced walking can’t, but there are a couple ways to look at that fact. If you hate running but enjoy walking, walking is “better for you” because you are more likely to keep doing it over time. A run is only good for you if you go on the run. Plus, it’s well-known that running bangs up your knees and joints mercilessly. You may keep mobile longer by opting for the gentler exercise. It’s a tortoise and the hare scenario.

    The Best Treadmills for Walking: Summed Up

    ProForm 505 CST
    Horizon T101
    Best High-Tech Treadmill
    Most Comfortable Walk
    MSRP
    $999
    $999
    Continuous Horsepower
    2.5 CHP
    2.25 CHP
    Max speed
    10 mph
    10 mph
    Max incline
    10%
    10%
    Max weight
    325 lbs.
    300 lbs.

    More Fitness Equipment Reviews

    It’s harder to come up with an excuse to not workout when a machine you love is sitting in the next room. We dredged sports medicine studies and the opinions of fitness professionals to arrive at top picks in exercise equipment of all ilks. Read up on why these machines made the cut in the reviews below.

    About the Authors

    Anne Dennon

    Anne Dennon Home Technology Writer

    Anne has covered home security and home automation for Reviews.com for two years. She's interested in human-computer interaction and tech ethics. She previously worked in education and information literacy.