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Last updated on Nov 19, 2019

The Best Kitchen Faucets

Durable materials meet stylish design ​

How We Found the Best Kitchen Faucets

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18 experts interviewed

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16 brands considered

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6 top picks

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The Best Kitchen Faucets

Any faucet will produce running water, but the best can adapt to different kitchen needs and endure decades of daily use. We talked to 18 experts, pored through hundreds of offerings from over a dozen brands, and contacted manufacturers directly to find out who’s making the best faucets on the market.

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The 6 Best Kitchen Faucets

Now for a closer look at our top six brands. We highlight a few of our favorite models in the reviews of each brand, but they all have dozens of faucets worthy of consideration. If you want to look at everything the brand has to offer, you can click the links in the list below. Links in the reviews will take you to the specific models shown.

    The Best Kitchen Faucets: Summed Up

    American Standard Delta Kohler Premier Faucet Brizo Vigo
    All-Around Brand All-Around Brand All-Around Brand Budget Brand Statement Brand Statement Brand
    Averaging $300–$500 Averaging $350–$400 Averaging $370–$750 Averaging $75–$200 Averaging $580–$932 Averaging $170–$260

    American Standard

    Why we chose it

    Plenty to choose from

    Whether you’re looking for a gooseneck pull-out hose, straight neck, two-handle, touch-controlled, or side spray faucet, American Standard has plenty to choose from. The company offers 48 faucets (averaging $300–$500) that feature ceramic discs and PVD finish options.

    Modern and classic aesthetics

    Most American Standard faucets are understated, classic pieces that would blend in well with a variety of kitchens. Though it offers both traditional and modern models, they were all designed with clean, soft, rounded lines.

    Multi-spray mode and more

    The pull-down model of the Delancey line, for example, has three spray modes (stream, spray, and pause) to handle a variety of cleaning tasks. In addition to this, it also has temperature memory which, as the name suggests, remembers the last temperature setting you used.

    American Standard Collage for Kitchen Faucets

    Points to consider

    Lack of finish options

    The one thing we found rather lacking among American Standard faucets was a lack of finish options. You’ll be able to choose from chrome and stainless steel for most models, but only a handful offer additional finishes like Bronze or Nickel. It’s also worth noting that if you want PVD, you’re also limited further regarding finishes; only stainless steel and polished nickel have PVD.

    Delta

    Why we chose it

    Bold design

    Delta’s faucets (averaging $350–$400) could be cousins to American Standard’s. They’re also classic and versatile, but the overall design personality is a little bolder. These faucets will still fit into any kitchen, but the sculpted designs give off a more youthful energy and draw more attention than American Standard faucets.

    High-tech

    Delta’s Touch2O feature is available across several of its collections. Most faucets have magnetic hose retraction and multiple spray modes, and some fancier ones such as Linden have automatic water shutoff and LED lights showing water temperature.

    Range of finishes

    Delta’s PVD finishes are called Brilliance and SpotShield, and come in a range of chrome, stainless steel, and bronze options.

    Delta Collage for Kitchen Faucets
    From left to right: Linden, Arabella, Allentown. Images: Delta

    Points to consider

    Hose length

    While it didn’t come up during our testing, there were some online reviewers that expressed some minor disappointment about the hose length. These reviewers claimed that hose was advertised at 59 inches and it measured about 54. Not necessarily a dealbreaker, but consider that point if you tend to max out your hose’s length.

    Kohler

    Why we chose it

    Range of looks from traditional to futuristic

    If you’re not sure what kind of aesthetic you’re looking for, Kohler can show you the world of possibilities out there. The Artifacts and Purist collections are good representations of the range of what Kohler offers: The Artifacts line is based on traditional, vintage aesthetics that would fit well in a period piece, whereas the Purist line is purely sleek and modern. It’s almost hard to believe all these hugely different faucets come from the same brand.

    High-tech features

    Kohler’s faucets feature temperature memory, multiple spray modes, and magnetic hose retraction. This allows for greater versatility when you’re in the kitchen cleaning plates or spraying down the sink.

    PVD Vibrant

    As we mentioned before, physical vapor deposition (PVD) finishing extends the life of a faucet. Kohler calls its PVD finish Vibrant, and features several finishes across its collections. Vibrant Stainless is the most common, but some collections — like the Purist and Artifacts — come in other Vibrant finishes, such as Vibrant Nickel and Vibrant Bronze.

    Kohler Collage for Kitchen Faucets
    From left to right: Purist, Artifacts, and Forte. Images: Kohler

    Points to consider

    Possibly overwhelming options

    Kohler offers 26 product families and more than 100 faucets, which makes it a great place to start browsing. But if you frequently find yourself overwhelmbed by having too many options, that range might leave you a little paralyzed. If that’s the case, we recommend Premier Faucet so you can browse a more digestible catalog of nine lines.

    Premier Faucet

    Why we chose it

    Budget-friendly

    Though not as famous as our big three, Premier Faucet holds its own with these heavy-hitters. We appreciate that most of Premier’s faucets averaged only $75–$200. The cheaper options are more traditional designs, while the $200 collections, like the Premier Faucet Essen, were more sleek and contemporary. If you’re looking for a quality, durable faucet that won’t bankrupt you, Premier Faucet is a great place to start your search.

    More than just faucets

    In addition to kitchen faucets, the brand also makes bathroom faucets, mirrors, vanities, toilets, and sinks. If you’re looking to refit your bathroom and kitchen on a budget, we recommend browsing through Premier’s options.

    Premier Collage for Kitchen Faucets
    From left to right: Waterfront, Essen, Premier Faucet Westlake. Images: Premier

    Points to consider

    Lacking extras

    We were a little disappointed to see that PVD finishing only came in the shade “PVD Brushed Nickel.” There aren’t a lot of special features, either. Some of the models come with two spray modes, but you won’t find hands-free tech or temperature memory among its offerings. Still, for less than $200, we think that’s pretty fair.

    Brizo

    Why we chose it

    Elegance

    Brizo has collaborated with fashion designer Jason Wu since 2007, and it shows in its offerings. The swan-like Vuelo is only one example with its graceful curves and immaculate finish.

    Modern touch

    In addition to its sleek and modern design, the Vuelo also handles like a faucet of the future. Despite being encased in metal pipe, there is a pull-down wand that runs flush with the rest of the housing—almost hidden, in a way. There’s also Brizo SmartTouch Technology, allowing you to activate the water just by touching any part of the faucet body, handle or spout.

    Brizo Collage for Kitchen Faucets

    Points to consider

    A bit pricey

    Even the cheapest faucet Brizo offers — somewhere in the neighborhood of $580 — can be a little pricey compared to some of the other brands we covered. If you’re looking for that same refinement and dependability at a lower price, we suggest looking at something in the American Standard Delancey collection.

    Vigo

    Why we chose it

    Cheap coil faucet

    Vigo models resemble Brizo’s articulated faucets for just a fraction of the price. The Edison coiled faucet, as an example, gives off an industrial, edgy feel for less than $200. It’s also constructed out of durable solid brass, has multiple spray modes, and comes in four shades, including matte black. For the person who wants a contemporary, stylish kitchen on a budget, we think it’s hard to go wrong with Vigo.

    Surprisingly low prices

    Vigo impressed us with its contemporary, statement designs, as well as its surprisingly low prices. Ranging from $170 to $260, these faucets are slick statement pieces that offer partial-to-full brass construction, multiple unique finishes, and eye-catching silhouettes at wallet-friendly prices.

    Vigo Collage for Kitchen Faucets
    From left to right: Edison, Dresden, Brant. Images: Vigo

    Points to consider

    No touch tech or chrome PVD

    None of them offer touch tech, so if you’re looking for a touchless statement faucet, Brizo might be a better bet for you. Vigo told us that all of its finishes, except for chrome, have PVD — so whether you fall for a stainless steel, matte black, bronze, or duo-tone faucet, rest easy knowing it’ll be resistant to scratches and stains.

    How We Chose the Best Kitchen Faucets

    Brand name

    The advice we heard over and over again? “Choose a quality brand.” When we spoke to Anna Gibson, owner of boutique kitchen design firm AKG Design Studio, she cautioned, “Buy cheap, buy twice.” What you save in buying a cheap faucet may end up costing you in repairs and replacements all the same. Don’t expect a $50 no-name faucet to last you more than a year or two, and if you have the choice, invest in a model that will serve you well for more than a few years.

    We considered 16 brands in total — the ones that experts told us they trust the most, ranging from traditional brands like American Standard to Brizo, a leader in luxury designer faucets.

    Leak-proof valves

    Dmitri Kara, of the tradesmen at Fantastic Handyman (London), told us “Older units use rubber compression valves to stop the supply of water when a washer or seal closed. Leaks start to occur when washers become damaged one way or the other. The newer models implement ceramic discs to stop the flow when ports are shut, which means there are no washers to suffer from erosion at all.” This, in turn, prevents leaks.

    Durable finishes

    Contractor and founder of RemodelingImage.com Aleksandr Biyevetskiy told us that a Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) finish costs more but resists scratching better than a dipped or plastic finish. Your faucet will still work just fine without a PVD finish, but may start showing signs of wear after a few years. Since we’re looking for the best, we required all of our top collections to have a PVD option.

    Brands with the most faucets meeting our criteria

    In the end, 11 brands passed our filters. We chose to highlight the six with the highest number of faucets that met our criteria below: American Standard, Delta, Kohler, Premier Faucet, Brizo, and Vigo. Based simply on numbers, these brands have the best chances of featuring designs you’ll like. The other five — Grohe, Moen, Kraus, Newport Brass, and Pfister — also offer ceramic, PVD finish options, but with just one to seven faucets each. That’s not to say that any of these brands are of lower quality than our top picks — just that there are fewer options per brand.

    How to Find the Right Kitchen Faucet for You

    Identify your kitchen needs and habits

    “Keep in mind that if the faucet leaks or its form doesn’t fit your functional needs, its attractive appearance will soon lose its charm. Design and functionality should fit the way you work in the kitchen.”


    Aleksandr Biyevetskiy Contractor and founder of RemodelingImage.com

    Do you handwash dishes frequently, or have low cabinets? Is your sink shallow, deep, or somewhere in between? No matter your lifestyle, the ideal kitchen faucet should combine both stunning looks and foolproof function.

    Make sure the faucet will fit your sink

    Avoid faucets that have dimensions close to or even larger than your sink, which will both look disproportionate and cause splashing. Designer Natasha Gupta also recommends being aware of headroom: “If you have cabinets above the sink, it is more likely you will need a short spouted faucet with a pull-out option.” Also, be sure to measure the clearance between your sink and backsplash and compare it with the dimensions of the faucet you’re considering: If it’s too tight, the faucet handle may hit the wall when you move it back.

    Make sure your sink has the right number of holes required to mount the faucet, too. Faucets can require one to four holes, depending on how many separate components it has (think multiple handles, a soap dispenser, or separate spray nozzle. We don’t recommend trying to “make it work” if the numbers don’t match up: HB McClure’s Residential Plumbing Service Writer Travis West warns, “drilling new holes can be difficult and commonly causes expensive damage to sinks if not done properly.”

    Consider high-tech features

    The most common special feature is multiple spray modes, which allows you to switch among two to four streams of varying water pressure, so you can change the pressure as needed when you’re handwashing dishes, or cleaning your sink. Some spray modes also allow you to pause the spray, so you don’t need to move the handle.

    Automatic shutoff saves water by turning off the flow after a set amount of time. Temperature memory, similar to pause mode, lets you to return to the last temperature set. Touch control gets rid of the handle entirely, only requiring a tap to start or stop the water flow, which is great for the chef or kid with messy hands.

    That said, you should know that this technology is relatively new, and hasn’t been perfected yet. According to Biyevetskiy, “The sensor should be on the neck near the spout,” If it’s located elsewhere, the sensitivity might be off, and not turn on when you tap it — or worse, turn off and on when you’re moving near the faucet. West also warns that touch faucets “require battery changes (annually for most models), which can be an inconvenience to the user.” That’s not to say you shouldn’t get a touch faucet — but just keep the potential drawbacks in mind as you’re searching for the right one.

    Kitchen Faucets FAQ

    About the Authors

    The Reviews.com staff is dedicated to providing you with all the deep-dive details. Our writers, researchers, and editors came together from Charlotte, Seattle, San Juan, Fort Worth, Fort Lauderdale, San Diego, and Chicago to put this review together.