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Last updated on Nov 20, 2019

The Best Water Filters

We’re 60 percent water — make sure it’s the good stuff ​

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3 experts interviewed

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12 water filters tested

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2 top picks

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The Best Water Filters

The best water filter for you depends on what’s in your water — and what you want gone. Weird taste? Bad smell? Scary contaminants? We talked with filter designers and water experts, determined the most important certifications, analyzed long-term costs, and poured a lot of water to find dependable filters that live up to their claims.

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The 2 Best Water Filters

    The Best Water Filters: Summed Up

    PUR 3-Stage Horizontal Water Filtration Faucet Mount
    Culligan FM-25 Faucet Mount Filter
    The best
    Water filter
    Budget filter
    Price
    $60
    Starting at $31
    Filter type
    Faucet
    Faucet
    Filter life (gallons)
    100
    200
    Filter price
    $26.99 (pack of 3)
    Starting at $12.59

    PUR 3-Stage Horizontal Water Filtration Faucet Mount

    The Best Water Filter
    Image for PUR-Faucet-Product-Image
    PUR

    PUR 3-Stage Horizontal Water Filtration Faucet Mount

    Pros

    Easy to install
    NSF-401-certified

    Cons

    Bulky
    Cheap material

    Why we chose it

    Easy to install

    PUR has “one-click” installation technology — all you have to do is hold down a few buttons on the side of the unit, press it up to your faucet, and let go, and the faucet mounts nice and tight.

    NSF-401-certified

    Of the five faucet filters we tested, PUR was the only one that is NSF-401-certified. It’s capable of filtering microbiological and pharmaceutical contaminants like bacteria, herbicides, and ibuprofen. While the risk from these contaminants is low, the certification is still reassuring.

    Points to consider

    Bulky

    The PUR is a downright giant. When we did dishes, the PUR was always in the way. Anyone without the luxury of a dishwasher might have to navigate around the faucet attachment whenever they’re rinsing the dishes.

    Cheap material

    When we first took it out of the box, the PUR looked pretty with its stainless steel finish, but it felt cheap because it was just metallic film over plastic. Many reviewers complained that after some use, the housing of the PUR filter cracked or leaked water. PUR has handled this feedback by offering a metal adapter attachment for free to customers who had any problems and offering a 30-day money-back satisfaction guarantee; however, it’s an inconvenience that’s hard to ignore.

    Culligan FM-25 Faucet Mount Water Filter

    The Best Budget Filter
    Image for Culligan-Product-Image
    Culligan

    Culligan FM-25 Faucet Mount Water Filter

    Pros

    Price
    Useful features

    Cons

    Weaker filter

    Why we chose it

    Price

    Depending on the finish you choose, the Culligan comes out to half the cost of the PUR, with comparably priced replacement filters. That’s not to say it sacrifices quality; the Culligan is made of real metal, and it has a uniquely compact look. As such, it feels like an actual part of a sink, not like a shiny, plastic barnacle. Unlike the PUR, it doesn’t impede dish washing and it integrates well with any existing design.

    Useful features

    The filter trigger is a metal pin: Pull it out and wait for the water to flow through. It takes longer to trigger than the plastic switches on the PUR or Brita, but it also feels like it’ll outlast them. Turn off the faucet and the filter defaults back to unfiltered water — a handy feature that’s unique among its competitors.

    Points to consider

    Weaker filter

    Our biggest complaint about the Culligan is the shorter list of NSF-53 contaminants it filters out. It only catches four: lead, atrazine, cysts, and/or turbidity. That’s part of the reason the filter lasts as long as it does — it just doesn’t have to work as hard. The filter is still certified-safe, and you’ll receive good-tasting water, but know that you’ll be getting a few more contaminants than with our other picks.

    How We Chose the Best Water Filters

    Third-party certified

    Most consumers don’t have a degree in hydrology or a scientist handy to verify a company’s claims about a water filter’s effectiveness. That’s why we looked to organizations like the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF), and the Water Quality Association (WQA). These organizations set and test water treatment standards, ensuring that the water you get from your filter is actually healthy.

    To make our cut, filters had to be certified for NSF-42 and NSF-53 standards by one of those agencies.

    We didn’t require NSF-401, the most demanding certification. A filter only earns 401 status if it’s capable of filtering microbiological and pharmaceutical contaminants like bacteria, herbicides, and ibuprofen. Most people don’t have to worry about those things in their drinking water, which is why we didn’t mandate it — but we definitely took notice if a filter had it.

    Flagship models

    From there, we looked at each certified brand and ordered the flagship filter from each. These filters may not have the latest-and-greatest technology (Brita, for instance, offers a model loaded with a Wi-Fi beacon that automatically orders replacement filters), but they represent the most popular models from each brand. With these 12 filters in-house, it was time to filter and pour to see how they fared under day-to-day use.

    Taste and odor

    Believe it or not, pure water bereft of its total dissolved solids (TDS) — potassium, sodium, and chloride — does not always make for better-tasting water. “In blind taste tests, stripped or ‘pure’ water doesn’t rank well,” says Arthur von Wiesenberger, a Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting Expert and author of H2O: The Guide to Quality Bottled Water. “Most people think it tastes bland and prefer water with some minerals for added flavor.” We found this to be true with the ZeroWater 10 Cup pitcher, which eliminates TDS and scored low in our taste tests.

    “On the whole, TDS doesn’t indicate any health concerns,” explains David Loveday, the head of government affairs with the WQA. “It’s more taste and odor.” That said, the EPA advises against drinking water with a TDS reading of more than 500 mg/L (the average across the U.S. is 350). In our tests, we preferred the filters that struck a happy medium.

    How to Find the Right Water Filter for You

    Read your municipal water quality report

    You won’t know what you need to filter out of your water until you know what’s in it. Your municipal water service is required to report on the most common contaminants in your water — just give them a call. The EPA also has a helpful online database with this information, or you can ask for a copy of your water utility’s annual report.

    Look into a free lead test

    If you’re worried about lead leaching from your pre-1986 pipes, see if your utility offers free lead tests. For drinkable water, look for a water filter that indicates the ability to filter out lead. Many with carbon filters can, including our faucet top picks.

    “When in doubt,” Beeman says, “run your water through the filter two or three times. It’s all about contact time — the longer your water runs through the filter, the higher the chance the bad stuff will get filtered out.”

    Compare ongoing costs

    Even though a water filter may seem like a one-time investment, you will also have to purchase replacement filters every three to six months. Before choosing a water filter, look at filter lifespans and the cost of replacements. If you have a lot of people in your household, filters will need to be replaced more frequently — so it’s wiser to choose a pitcher or faucet with cheap replacement filters.

    Water Filter FAQ

    About the Authors

    The Reviews.com staff is dedicated to providing you with all the deep-dive details. Our writers, researchers, and editors came together from Charlotte, Seattle, San Juan, Fort Worth, Fort Lauderdale, San Diego, and Chicago to put this review together.