The Best Job Sites

After weeks of research, interviews with recruiters and hiring experts, and a full month of testing, we know this: that Indeed, Glassdoor, and LinkedIn are the best, most effective job sites. But none of them are a one-stop-shop. If you’re serious about getting the job, you’ll have to take a multi-dimensional approach — which means scanning job boards, doing your research, and (yes) networking. Fear not, our top picks make it easy to do all three things without ever getting up from your desk.

The 6 Best Job Sites

  • Indeed -

    Most Listings

  • Glassdoor -

    Best Company Profiles

  • LinkedIn -

    Best Networking Tools

  • Dice -

    Best for Tech and Engineering Jobs

  • Mediabistro -

    Best for Marketing, PR, and Journalism Jobs

  • JobisJob -

    Best for International Jobs

Most Listings
Indeed
Indeed
Start your search here; Indeed has the most listings of any job board, and will help you get a feel for the current market.
Pros
Effective search algorithms
Advanced filtering
Improved platform
Cons
Surface-level profiles
Extensive user base

Why we chose it

Effective search algorithms

We spent two weeks keeping a careful eye on our job boards, monitoring new posts on each and taking note of the jobs that showed up on multiple sites. Indeed came out on top with the greatest volume of listings overall. Out of the 96 new posts we saw in that time, Indeed had 40 (although Glassdoor followed close behind with 33).

This number is partly thanks to original postings; it’s free for employers to list jobs on Indeed, so it’s the first stop for many companies. Indeed also has a winning aggregation algorithm. Of all the sites we tested, it did the best job scraping other job boards and company websites to find jobs listed elsewhere.

Sheer numbers make Indeed a smart place for anyone to begin their job search — you’ll be able to see a wide variety of open positions and get a sense of the current job market in your field.

Advanced filtering

If you’re looking for a specific gig, Indeed offers advanced filtering options to help reign in your results. Job hunters can hone their search based on job type (e.g. part-time, contract, or full-time); salary range; experience level; and company.

You can also set filters for specific keywords or titles. For instance, an experienced marketer in Chicago, IL might narrow down the list of 9,469 “marketing” jobs to just 88, by only showing posts with the phrase “marketing director” in their title. We also love the option to filter for jobs “with none of these words” in the title — any easy way to block repeat or irrelevant posts that you’re sick of scrolling past.

Improved platform

When we first reviewed job sites in 2017, we dinged Indeed for its less-than-user-friendly platform. If you’ve used it in the past, you may remember being bounced from page to page (so many tabs!). We’re happy to report that Indeed has since stepped up its game.

Today, the site now looks a lot like its competitor Glassdoor, with a floating sidebar that lets you view specific posts while keeping your place on the page. That means no more losing your spot every time you click on a post. It also means you can do a quick scan for details and requirements, then be back to your search lickety-split if the job doesn’t look like a good match.

Points to consider

Surface-level profiles

Indeed is sort of like speed dating: all your options are laid out in front of you, and it’s great for a brief meet-and-greet. But it’s pretty surface-level. Indeed doesn’t let you build out a personal profile, and its company pages are less impressive than Glassdoor’s. It doesn’t include any networking tools, either — so besides dropping an application into the void, there’s no real way to connect with potential employers.

If you’re interested in a job on Indeed and ready to take things to the next level, that’s where our other top picks come in. With Glassdoor’s library of full-fledged company profiles, you’ll get to know your prospects a little better, and LinkedIn’s robust networking tools let you make real connections with the ones you like.

Extensive user base

Indeed has earned massive popularity thanks to its free listings and proven search algorithms. While this reputation has big perks — namely, that hiring managers flock here in droves — it also has one downside. There are so many job hunters using Indeed that you’re likely to be one of hundreds interested in any given post.

While Indeed is a great starting place to look for openings, we don’t recommend clicking that “Easily apply” button. Instead, try going through the company’s website — or better yet, fire up your LinkedIn profile and see if you can connect with a recruiter or hiring manager. The recruiting experts we spoke with universally agree that you’re much more likely to get hired through an in-person referral than by submitting your resume on a job board.

Best Company Profiles
Glassdoor
Glassdoor
Glassdoor is stop number two; dig deeper into your prospects with company reviews, employee ratings, and projected salaries.
Pros
Robust company profiles
Excellent user interface
“Give-to-get” philosophy
Cons
Sponsored posts aren’t labeled
Lots of emails

Why we chose it

Robust company profiles

Like our other top picks, Glassdoor works well as a job search engine. But the site’s primary function is a company review site that emphasizes transparency in the workplace. It’s a platform for employees to write honestly about their work experience; from interview questions, to company culture, to salaries and benefits. Basically, everything you’d want to know about a potential employer before signing on to work there.

Although other sites host company profiles as well — most notably, Indeed has gotten into the ratings game — we maintain that Glassdoor does it best. It breaks down company ratings into clear and useful metrics; like what percentage of employees would recommend the company to a friend, what the interviewing process was like, and what growth opportunities looks like. It’s easy to read and gives you an authentic snapshot of company culture.

Excellent user interface

Glassdoor’s other huge selling point? It’s truly a pleasure to use. When you search for a position — which Glassdoor conveniently saves for future visits — open positions pop up in a column to the left, while the job description appears in a preview window to the right. That means you can scroll and click around without losing your place or opening new tabs. (Indeed redesigned its site to function the same way, which we see as a testament to Glassdoor’s excellent design).

In terms of aesthetics, Glassdoor is the polar opposite of Indeed’s bare-bones design. It’s heavy on charts and infographics, which we love for getting a clear picture of a company’s ratings at a glance. Companies are also able to create multimedia profiles: they can upload cover photos, company information, and even behind-the-scenes videos to give job hunters an idea of day-to-day life on site.

All of these features translate seamlessly to Glassdoor’s mobile app, as well. Although job searching may never be “fun,” Glassdoor’s interactive and user-friendly platform make the hunt more enjoyable than any of our competitors.

“Give-to-get” philosophy

Glassdoor doesn’t charge any subscription fees for job hunters, so you can search to your heart’s content for free. Instead, the company operates on what it calls a “Give-to-get” model. If you want full access to company ratings, you’ll have to be an active participant on the site. That means creating a profile and posting at least one thing — whether it’s a company review, salary, or interview experience. It can be as much or as little as you like.

While this takes a little more effort on the job seeker’s part, we appreciate Glassdoor’s tit-for-tat philosophy. It ensures a wide range of respondents and up-to-date company reviews.

Points to consider

Sponsored posts aren’t labeled

It’s not free to post jobs on Glassdoor; employers must pay for every listing. They also have the option to pay more for prime real estate at the top of the page. Indeed lets employers purchase better placement too, but there’s one key difference: Indeed tells you clearly which posts are sponsored, and Glassdoor does not. This is a bit misleading for job hunters. You’ll have to remember that jobs aren’t always listed in order of relevance or date posted.

Lots of emails

We aren’t thrilled that Glassdoor auto-subscribes users to its email list. It means near-daily alerts about job listings, both for searches you make and companies you view. While this isn’t a bad thing in and of itself, Glassdoor’s emails didn’t feel particularly helpful.

We kept seeing the same companies pop up over and over again — making us wonder if we were only getting alerts for sponsored listings. And if your inbox is already overflowing, you’ll have to take the time to unsubscribe.

Best Networking Tools
LinkedIn
LinkedIn
LinkedIn moves your job search from online to the real world; take advantage of advanced networking tools and start connecting with recruiters at promising companies.
Pros
Valuable networking features
Personal brand-building
Cons
Fewer postings
Premium access is pricey

Why we chose it

Valuable networking features

LinkedIn, admittedly, wasn’t the top performer as a job board. But it should still be an integral part of your search. When we interviewed, Steve Dalton, a program director at Duke University’s Business School, and the author of The 2-Hour Job Search, he cued us in on the hard truth about job hunting online. “It’s the black hole that everyone thinks it is,” he says. “For every one person hired through an online job application program, 12 are hired by an internal referral.”

That’s where LinkedIn can help. The site lets you search for connections by name, company, or title; so before applying to a job, you can reach out to others at the company. You might message someone in a similar position, for example, to glean information about job details and the interview process. If you’re feeling bold, you could even track down a hiring manager and reach out directly. Taking proactive steps like these can help your application stand out from the competition — and could even score you a referral if you play your cards right.

Personal brand-building

Most job sites are a one-way dialogue: you look at postings and apply if you’re interested. But on LinkedIn, there’s a back-and-forth. Not only are you scoping out employers and contacting recruiters, but they can view your information and engage with you as well. This is why it’s essential to build out a professional, polished profile. (After you’ve created an account, LinkedIn will prompt you to fill in each field. Follow those prompts.)

We love that LinkedIn gives you tons of tools to customize your profile. Unlike Indeed and Glassdoor — which let you upload a simple resume for applications — your LinkedIn resume is an interactive affair. You can add blurbs for each position, company logos, even multimedia links to showcase projects you’ve worked on.

LinkedIn also lets you develop a unique brand. By adding a profile photo, cover image, and personal bio, you can show employers what makes you you — an opportunity you won’t get through other job sites.

Points to consider

Fewer postings

From a job posting standpoint, LinkedIn isn’t all that impressive. It had fewer total listings than either Indeed or Glassdoor in our tests. It was also middle of the pack as far as overlap, meaning it was missing jobs that we saw listed across multiple other sites. All this is to say that LinkedIn is not a one-stop-shop. Use it for networking, but make sure you’re also checking posts on Indeed and Glassdoor so that you don’t miss out on anything juicy.

Premium access is pricey

Job seekers can create a basic profile on LinkedIn and use most of the site’s tools for free. However, there are a few key features that only Premium subscribers have access to. LinkedIn Premium users can send direct messages to recruiters (even if they’re not connected); see everyone that’s viewed their profile; get insights on their resume; and stand out as a “featured” applicant. These Premium capabilities are nifty, but they come at a steep price — accounts start at $30 per month.

Best for Tech and Engineering Jobs
Dice
Dice
Dice is the number one job board for STEM positions, as well as a recruiting hub for many big-name tech companies.
Pros
Go-to for major tech companies
Helpful career center
Cons
Restricted scope

Dice is top dog for STEM jobs, with a focus on technology, security clearance, financial services, energy, and healthcare. While the site lets you search for openings like Indeed and Glassdoor, we were chiefly impressed with its career-building toolkit.

Dice’s “career explorer” helps tech and engineer professionals find their footing, with insights into their market value, projected salaries, and possible career paths. In addition, the site offers hundreds of blog posts, studies, and forums focused on helping you get hired in these fast-growing fields.

Dice is also the first stop for corporate tech giants (think Dell, Cisco, Deloitte, Apple, and more). Applicants can search by position or view all openings at these popular companies. What’s more, corporations can use Dice to search for qualified applicants as well — so be sure to keep your resume updated, and employers may even reach out to you.

Best for Marketing, PR, and Journalism Jobs
Mediabistro
Mediabistro
Mediabistro is geared toward creative types, with job listings, recruiting, and career advice for all media-related fields.
Pros
Training and career services
Go-to for major media outlets
Cons
Restricted scope

If you’re seeking work in media, advertising, PR, or journalism, Mediabistro should definitely be a stop along the way. Like our other top picks, Mediabistro functions as a job board. But where this site really shines is its career services. For a fee, it’ll hook you up with experts who can review your resume, edit a cover letter, or help perfect your LinkedIn profile. It also offers career advice tailored to creative fields. From articles on “hot jobs” by industry, to interview tips and freelancing advice, the site serves up the info you need to land a great gig.

Mediabistro isn’t just for job seekers, either. The site is a destination for major media outlets looking to hire qualified candidates; from HBO, to PBS, to the Meredith Corporation, and beyond. Once you’ve polished up your resume and portfolio, make sure to post them to your Mediabistro profile so that employers can see your credentials.

Best for International Jobs
JobisJob
JobisJob
If you’re looking for a new gig and a change of pace, check out JobisJob; our favorite site for international job boards and finding industry hotspots.
Pros
International reach
Job market hotspot map
Cons
Spammy posts

JobisJob is our only finalist with international job boards, which cover 28 countries across Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Africa. If you’ve got wanderlust, this is your site.

We especially love JobisJob’s geographic hotspot feature: an interactive map that shows where the most thriving job markets are. To top it off, JobisJob made a strong showing in almost all of our tests. It had tons of fresh postings daily, sent us email alerts that actually felt helpful, and came in just behind Indeed and Glassdoor for the overall quality of jobs listed.

The only reason JobisJob didn’t make our top picks was that its algorithm slipped up a few too many times. For example; listings in Dallas, Iowa kept showing up when we searched for Dallas, Texas. JobIsJob also fell prey to a classic posting trick: when we searched “nurse practitioner,” it turned up jobs titled “Become an Uber Driver Partner — Instead of a Nurse Practitioner.” These quirks took JobisJob out as a frontrunner, but the site is still worth a look — especially if you’re hoping to snag a job abroad.

How to Find a Great Job Online

Be proactive, not reactive in your search

It’s easy to send in applications, then sit back and wait for a response. That generally feels like the right or normal thing to do. But the hard reality, as Steve Dalton explains, is that “you won’t have much to show for it.” He offers an alternative.

“I liken it to the TV show, The Bachelor. When you chase postings, you’re one of 25 bachelorettes, or, in this case, more like 250 bachelorettes. A better approach is to be the bachelor in your own job search: Juggle many employers simultaneously, but approach them in a relationship-based manner, rather than a posting-based manner.”

Steve DaltonAuthor of “The 2-Hour Job Search” and Program Director for Daytime Career Services at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business

In more tangible terms: get to know your future employers, and get referrals. “When you apply for an online job posting, you’re a number,” says Dalton. “When you apply through a referral it takes a little longer, but you’ll be treated better and your results will be much different.”

Get referrals: turn strangers into advocates

If the word “network” is anxiety-inducing for you, you’re not alone. It’s hard to approach a potential employer or co-worker — especially when your end goal is to get an inside referral.

According to Dalton, there are three kinds of people every job hunter can expect to meet when looking for an advocate within a company: Curmudgeons, Obligates, and Boosters. Curmudgeons likely won’t respond. Obligates often feel compelled to answer, but ultimately leave you hanging. (Look out for slow responses, vague plans to talk in the future, or canceled meetings).

What you really want is to find a Booster. Dalton explains: “When you encounter a Booster, they say things like ‘if you tell me you need help, you automatically get 15 minutes of my time.’ I’d estimate that they’re about 20 percent of the population. You’ll have to kiss a lot of frogs, but the princes are disproportionately worth it.”

How do you take the first step to land a Booster? Send an email asking for an informational interview and ask them to talk about themselves and their work. If you receive a prompt response and definitive plans to chat, you’ve likely made a valuable connection. Use it.

Don’t get discouraged

If it were easy to find a job, there would be no job sites. Stay focused — remember job sites are a tool, not a crutch, and make networking offline a priority.

“Get out and meet people,” Rogan (a seasoned recruiter) told us. “You’ll likely have to push yourself outside of your comfort zone, but that’s how opportunities present themselves. That’s how you find a job.”

FAQs

Which job sites are free?

All of our top picks are free for job seekers. There are no subscription fees on Indeed or Glassdoor, and LinkedIn only charges for Premium features. That said, employers generally pay a pretty steep fee for listings (for example, a single post on Glassdoor may cost as much as $350 depending on location). Only Indeed lets companies post jobs for free, which is part of the reason it has more listings overall than any other site we looked at.

Which job sites show salary?

It’s not up to a job site whether to show salary — most companies simply don’t include that information in their job listings. For a rough estimate, though, you can try looking the position up on Glassdoor. The site uses salaries from employees with similar jobs to estimate what a new listing is likely to pay. These numbers aren’t set in stone, but they’ll give you an feel for projected salary range.

What about ZipRecruiter?

We were curious about ZipRecruiter — a relatively new site you’ve probably heard advertised on your favorite podcast — so we added it to our list and did another full round of testing. The result: ZipRecruiter couldn’t deliver. While it’s fairly user-friendly and keeps up fresh posts, the site fell far behind our other top picks for overlap. Of the 96 jobs we tallied, Indeed turned up 40, Glassdoor 33, and ZipRecruiter only two. That means job hunters using ZipRecruiter will miss out on tons of postings that they’d have access to on other sites.

The Best Job Sites: Summed Up

Indeed
Glassdoor
LinkedIn
Dice
Mediabistro
JobisJob
The Best
Number of Listings
Company Profiles
Networking Tools
Tech & Engineering Jobs
Marketing, PR, & Journalism Jobs
Inter- national Jobs
Free Search Engine
Paid Version
$30+/mo.
$99+
Employers Find You
Networking Tools
New Job Notifications

More Job-Search Resources

Using the best job sites is a good start, but it’s only half the battle. You still have to land the job. While researching this review we spoke with plenty of recruiters and hiring experts who gave us some excellent pointers. You can read their advice in our step-by-step guide to getting hired.