Last updated on Nov 19, 2019

The Best Job Sites

Making the job of looking for a job a little easier ​
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How We Found the Best Job Sites

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57 job sites considered

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30 days of testing

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6 top picks

The Best Job Sites

The best job site should be simple and easy to use, serving you up relevant and recent job listings. Searching for a new job can be as stressful as it is personal, and the sunk costs of wasted time pouring over job sites can be immense. That’s why we looked at over 50 different sites that help you look for your new career. After a month of researching we chose 6 sites that are fresh, flexible, and user-friendly.

The Best Job Sites: Summed Up

Indeed Glassdoor LinkedIn Dice MediaBistro JobisJob
Best for Number of Listings Company Profiles Networking Tools Tech and Engineering Jobs Marketing, PR, and Journalism Jobs International Jobs
Free search engine
Paid version Premium starting at $29.99/mo. Career services starting at $99
Employers find you
Networking tools
New job notifications
Learn more Learn more Learn more Learn more Learn more Learn more

How We Chose the Best Job Sites

We started with a list of 57 job sites that anyone could use to jump-start their search. Industry-specific websites weren’t included either; while these niche sites can be useful, they won’t appeal to every candidate. (Although there were a few that caught our eye during research and testing; you can read more about those below).

Convenient features

To narrow the playing field, we prioritized three select criteria that are vital to a successful job search:

  • Filter by date: This function lets you sort for fresh posts — without having to sift through the same jobs over and over again.
  • Mobile app compatibility: If you’re among the 94% of smartphone owners that use their phone to surf job boards, this is a must-have. A well-designed app makes it easy to job hunt and even fill out applications no matter where you are.
  • Daily email alerts: These can deliver relevant opportunities straight to your inbox — no searching required.

After eliminating websites that didn’t have all three features, we were left with 13 promising job sites. We spent a month testing them to find the best.

Easy-to-use interfaces

Our first round of testing focused on the user experience for each site. Hunting for jobs requires a lot of time staring, scrolling, and clicking, so even small design or navigation flaws can become a major frustration. With that in mind, we made sure to cut websites with annoying pop-up ads, confusing layouts, or navigational flaws. To give an example: One site kept asking us to refine our search from “Los Angeles, CA,” to “City Terrace Branch County of Los Angeles Public Library.” Huh?

The winners have thoughtful layouts that make searching, viewing posts, and applying a breeze. Stick with our top picks, and you won’t have to endure the headache of navigating 30 different tabs, or worse, the page bugging out halfway through an application.

Fresh, relevant search results

In round two, we evaluated each company’s search results and their relevance. These sites determine search relevance by using an algorithm. Algorithms are what make a job site tick: when you enter a query, they comb through troves of listings to (hopefully) find the most relevant openings for you. Primarily, we examined the overall freshness of posts; we wanted sites that deliver listings that are new or recently updated. We determined this by recording the total number of listings on each site per day, as well as the post date of the first 50 results (according to Tejaswi Tenneti, a software engineer and former Monster employee, “most users don’t go past 40 or 50 jobs”).

High-quality listings

Of course, the best job site doesn’t just churn up tons of listings. Our top picks not only consistently uncover high-quality jobs, but also find ones you’re likely to be interested in.

To assess the quality of our search results, we analyzed the first ten posts on every site, every day: the location had to be accurate; the position we searched for had to actually be in the title; there had to be a link back to the original posting; and the date on the search engine had to match the company’s posting date.

Indeed and Glassdoor came out on top — hitting the mark about 64% of the time — with LinkedIn following not far behind.

The 6 Best Job Sites

    Most Listings
    Indeed

    Indeed

    Pros

    Relevant and accurate search results
    Advanced filtering
    Improved site infrastructure

    Cons

    Surface-level profiles
    Extensive user base

    Why we chose it

    Relevant and accurate search results

    We spent two weeks keeping a careful eye on our job boards, monitoring new posts on each and taking note of the jobs that showed up on multiple sites. Indeed came out on top with the greatest volume of listings overall. Out of the 96 new posts we saw in that time, Indeed had 40 (although Glassdoor followed close behind with 33).

    This number is partly thanks to original postings; it’s free for employers to list jobs on Indeed, so it’s the first stop for many companies. Indeed also has a winning aggregation algorithm. Of all the sites we tested, it did the best job scraping other job boards and company websites to find jobs listed elsewhere.

    Sheer numbers make Indeed a smart place for anyone to begin their job search — you’ll be able to see a wide variety of open positions and get a sense of the current job market in your field.

    Advanced filtering

    If you’re looking for a specific gig, Indeed offers advanced filtering options to help reign in your results. Job hunters can hone their search based on job type (e.g. part-time, contract, or full-time), salary range, experience level, and company.

    You can also set filters for specific keywords or titles. For instance, an experienced marketer in Chicago, IL might narrow down the list of 9,469 “marketing” jobs to just 88, by only showing posts with the phrase “marketing director” in their title. We also love the option to filter for jobs “with none of these words” in the title — any easy way to block repeat or irrelevant posts that you’re sick of scrolling past.

    Improved site infrastructure

    When we first reviewed job sites in 2017, we dinged Indeed for its less-than-user-friendly platform. If you’ve used it in the past, you may remember being bounced from page to page — we’re happy to report that Indeed has since stepped up its game.

    Today, the site now looks a lot like its competitor Glassdoor, with a dynamic sidebar that lets you view specific listings while keeping your place on the page. This means no more losing your spot every time you click on a post. It also means you can do a quick scan for details and requirements, then get back to your search lickety-split if the job doesn’t look like a good match.

    Points to consider

    Surface-level profiles

    Indeed is sort of like speed dating: all your options are laid out in front of you, and it’s great for a brief meet-and-greet. But it’s a pretty surface-level experience. Indeed doesn’t let you build out a personal profile, and its company pages are less impressive than Glassdoor’s. It doesn’t include any networking tools, either — so besides dropping an application into the void, there’s no real way to connect with potential employers.

    If you’re interested in a job on Indeed and ready to take things to the next level, that’s where our other top picks come in. With Glassdoor’s library of full-fledged company profiles, you’ll get to know your prospects a little better, and LinkedIn’s robust networking tools let you make real connections with the ones you like.

    Extensive user base

    Indeed has earned massive popularity thanks to its free listings and reliable search results. While this reputation has big perks — namely, that hiring managers flock here in droves — it also has one downside. There are so many job hunters using Indeed that you’re likely to be one of hundreds interested in any given post.

    While Indeed is a great starting place to look for openings, we don’t recommend clicking that “Apply Now” button. Instead, try going through the company’s website — or better yet, fire up your LinkedIn profile and see if you can connect with a recruiter or hiring manager. The recruiting experts we spoke with universally agree that you’re much more likely to get hired through an in-person referral than by submitting your resume on a job board.

    Best Company Profiles
    Glassdoor

    Glassdoor

    Pros

    Robust company profiles
    Intuitive user interface
    “Give-to-get” philosophy

    Cons

    Sponsored posts aren’t labeled
    Lots of emails

    Why we chose it

    Robust company profiles

    Like our other top picks, Glassdoor works well as a job search engine, but the site’s primary function is a company review site that emphasizes transparency in the workplace. The site provides a platform for employees to write honestly and openly about their work experience; from interview questions, to company culture, to salaries and benefits. Basically, everything you’d want to know about a potential employer before signing on to work there.

    Although other sites host company profiles as well — most notably, Indeed has gotten into the ratings game — we maintain that Glassdoor does it best. It breaks down company ratings into clear and useful metrics; like what percentage of employees would recommend the company to a friend, what the interviewing process was like, and what growth opportunities looks like. It’s easy to read and gives you an authentic snapshot of company culture.

    Intuitive user interface

    Glassdoor’s other huge selling point? It offers an exceptional user experience. When you search for a position — which Glassdoor conveniently saves for future visits — open positions pop up in a column to the left, while the job description appears in a preview window to the right. That means you can scroll and click around without losing your place or opening new tabs. (Indeed redesigned its site to function the same way, which we see as a testament to Glassdoor’s excellent design).

    In terms of aesthetics, Glassdoor is the polar opposite of Indeed’s bare-bones design. It’s heavy on charts and infographics, which gives you a robust and in-depth look at potential careers. Companies are also able to create multimedia profiles: they can upload cover photos, company information, and even behind-the-scenes videos to give job hunters an idea of day-to-day life on site.

    All of these features translate seamlessly to Glassdoor’s mobile app, as well. Although job searching may never be “fun,” Glassdoor’s interactive and user-friendly platform make the hunt more enjoyable than any of our competitors.

    “Give-to-get” philosophy

    Glassdoor doesn’t charge any subscription fees for job hunters, so you can search to your heart’s content for free. Instead, the company operates on what it calls a “Give-to-get” model. If you want full access to company ratings, you’ll have to be an active participant on the site. That means creating a profile and posting at least one thing — whether it’s a company review, salary, or interview experience. It can be as much or as little as you like. While this takes a little more effort on the job seeker’s part, we appreciate Glassdoor’s internal economy, as it makes job hunters more engaged. It ensures that every user is a stakeholder in their job search, and raises the overall freshness of the site.

    Points to consider

    Sponsored posts aren’t labeled

    It’s not free to post jobs on Glassdoor; employers must pay for every listing. They also have the option to pay more for prime real estate at the top of the page. Indeed lets employers purchase better placement, too, but there’s one key difference: Indeed tells you clearly which posts are sponsored, and Glassdoor does not. This is misleading for job hunters, and means you’ll have to keep in mind that jobs aren’t always listed in order of relevance or date posted.

    Lots of emails

    We aren’t thrilled that Glassdoor auto-subscribes users to its email list, either. So your inbox will be inundated with near-daily alerts for any listing or company you’ve interacted with. While this isn’t a bad thing in and of itself, Glassdoor’s emails don’t feel like they offer any tangible utility. We kept seeing the same companies pop up over and over again — making us wonder if we were only getting alerts for sponsored listings. And if your inbox is already overflowing, you’ll have to take the time to unsubscribe.

    Best Networking Tools
    LinkedIn

    LinkedIn

    Pros

    Valuable networking features
    Personal brand-building

    Cons

    Fewer postings
    Premium access is pricey

    Why we chose it

    Valuable networking features

    LinkedIn, admittedly, wasn’t the top performer as a job board. But it should still be an integral part of your search. When we interviewed, Steve Dalton, a program director at Duke University’s Business School, and the author of The 2-Hour Job Search, he cued us in on the hard truth about job hunting online. “It’s the black hole that everyone thinks it is,” he says. “For every one person hired through an online job application program, 12 are hired by an internal referral.”

    That’s where LinkedIn can help. The site lets you search for connections by name, company, or title; so before applying for a job, you can reach out to others at the company. LinkedIn lets you take proactive steps to help you stand out from the competition, and learn more about your future role. You might message someone in a similar position, for example, to glean information about job details and the interview process. If you’re feeling bold, you could even track down a hiring manager and reach out directly. LinkedIn lets you really connect with potential employers, and its social design means you can learn more about internal aspects of the company that aren’t usually provided in a job description.

    Personal brand-building

    Most job sites are a one-way dialogue: you look at postings and apply if you’re interested. But LinkedIn facilitates a back-and-forth, encouraging both employers and applicants to build relationships. Applicants aren’t the only ones looking for potential opportunities, employers are, too. They can view your profile and engage with you directly, adding some much needed dynamism to the job hunt. This is why it’s essential to build out a professional, polished profile. LinkedIn makes that easy by giving new users step-by-step prompts on filling out their profile.

    We love that LinkedIn gives you tons of tools to customize your profile. You can add blurbs for each position, company logos, even multimedia links to showcase projects you’ve worked on. Unlike Indeed and Glassdoor — which let you upload a simple resume for applications — your LinkedIn profile becomes a portfolio of experience. LinkedIn also lets you develop a unique brand. By adding your work history, interests, skills, and references , you can show employers what makes you you — an opportunity you won’t get through other job sites.

    Points to consider

    Fewer postings

    From a job posting standpoint, LinkedIn isn’t all that impressive. It had fewer total listings than either Indeed or Glassdoor in our tests. It was also middle of the pack as far as overlap, meaning it was missing jobs that we saw listed across multiple other sites. All this is to say that LinkedIn is not a one-stop-shop. Use it for networking, but make sure you’re also checking posts on Indeed and Glassdoor so that you don’t miss out on anything juicy.

    Premium access is pricey

    Job seekers can create a basic profile on LinkedIn and use most of the site’s tools for free. However, there are a few key features that only Premium subscribers have access to. LinkedIn Premium users can send direct messages to employers (even if they’re not connected); see everyone that’s viewed their profile; get insights on their resume; and stand out as a “featured” applicant. These Premium capabilities are nifty, but they come at a price — starting at $30 per month.

    Best for Tech and Engineering Jobs
    Dice

    Dice

    Pros

    Go-to for major tech companies
    Helpful career center

    Cons

    Restricted scope

    Dice is top dog for STEM jobs, with a focus on technology, security, financial services, energy, and healthcare. While the site lets you search for openings like Indeed and Glassdoor, we were chiefly impressed with its career-building toolkit. Dice’s “career explorer” helps tech and engineer professionals find their footing, with insights into their market value, projected salaries, and possible career paths. In addition, the site offers hundreds of blog posts, studies, and forums focused on helping you get hired in these fast-growing fields. The ethos of Dice is also very appealing, giving job hunters access to a breadth of resource pieces, and industry insights. What’s more, corporations can use Dice to search for qualified applicants as well. This focus on insider data makes Dice the perfect platform for emerging opportunities for technology-specific careers.

    Best for Marketing, PR, and Journalism Jobs
    Mediabistro

    Mediabistro

    Pros

    Training and career services
    Go-to for major media outlets

    Cons

    Restricted scope

    If you’re seeking work in media, advertising, PR, or journalism, Mediabistro should definitely be a stop along the way. Like our other top picks, Mediabistro functions as a job board. But where this site really shines is its career services. For a fee, you’ll be connected with experts who can review your resume, edit a cover letter, or help perfect your LinkedIn profile. It also offers career advice tailored to creative fields. From articles on “hot jobs” by industry, to interview tips and freelancing advice, the site serves up the info you need to land a great gig.

    Mediabistro isn’t just for job seekers, either. The site is a destination for major media outlets looking to hire qualified candidates; from HBO, to PBS, to the Meredith Corporation, and beyond. Once you’ve polished up your resume and portfolio, make sure to post them to your Mediabistro profile so that employers can see your credentials.

    Best for International Jobs
    JobisJob

    JobisJob

    Pros

    International reach
    Job market hotspot map

    Cons

    Poor site layout

    JobisJob is our only finalist with international job boards, which cover 28 countries across Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Africa. If you’ve got wanderlust, this is your site. We especially love JobisJob’s geographic hotspot feature: an interactive map that shows where the most thriving job markets are. To top it off, JobisJob made a strong showing in almost all of our tests. It had tons of fresh postings daily, sent us email alerts that actually felt helpful, and came in just behind Indeed and Glassdoor for the overall quality of jobs listed.

    One main reason we didn’t have a better impression of JobisJob is its user interface. The site itself is functional, but has an outdated vibe. Not only does it have a bare bones design like Indeed, but it is cluttered with ads. Ads appear as results while searching, and while they are clearly identifiable, they take up a lot of space.

    How to Find a Great Job Online

    Be proactive, not reactive in your search

    It’s easy to send in applications, then sit back and wait for a response. For a lot of job seekers that is standard practice. But the hard reality, as Steve Dalton explains, is that “you won’t have much to show for it.” He offers an alternative.

    “I liken it to the TV show, The Bachelor. When you chase postings, you’re one of 25 bachelorettes, or, in this case, more like 250 bachelorettes. A better approach is to be the bachelor in your own job search: Juggle many employers simultaneously, but approach them in a relationship-based manner, rather than a posting-based manner.”


    Steve Dalton
    Author of “The 2-Hour Job Search” and Program Director for Daytime Career Services at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business

    In more tangible terms: get to know your future employers, and get referrals. “When you apply for an online job posting, you’re a number,” says Dalton. “When you apply through a referral it takes a little longer, but you’ll be treated better and your results will be much different.”

    Get referrals: turn strangers into advocates

    If the word “network” is anxiety-inducing for you, you’re not alone. It’s hard to approach a potential employer or co-worker — especially when your end goal is to get an inside referral.

    According to Dalton, there are three kinds of people every job hunter can expect to meet when looking for an advocate within a company: Curmudgeons, Obligates, and Boosters. Curmudgeons likely won’t respond. Obligates often feel compelled to answer, but ultimately leave you hanging. (Look out for slow responses, vague plans to talk in the future, or canceled meetings).

    What you really want is to find a Booster. Dalton explains: “When you encounter a Booster, they say things like ‘if you tell me you need help, you automatically get 15 minutes of my time.’ I’d estimate that they’re about 20 percent of the population. You’ll have to kiss a lot of frogs, but the princes are disproportionately worth it.”

    How do you take the first step to land a Booster? Send an email asking for an informational interview and ask them to talk about themselves and their work. If you receive a prompt response and definitive plans to chat, you’ve likely made a valuable connection. Use it.

    Don’t get discouraged

    If it were easy to find a job, there would be no job sites. Stay focused — remember job sites are a tool, not a crutch, and make networking offline a priority.

    “Get out and meet people,” Rogan (a seasoned recruiter) told us. “You’ll likely have to push yourself outside of your comfort zone, but that’s how opportunities present themselves. That’s how you find a job.”

    Job Sites FAQ

    More Job-Search Resources

    Using the best job sites is a good start, but it’s only half the battle. You still have to land the job. While researching this review we spoke with plenty of recruiters and hiring experts who gave us some excellent pointers. You can read their advice in our step-by-step guide to getting hired.

    About the Authors

    The Reviews.com staff is dedicated to providing you with all the deep-dive details. Our writers, researchers, and editors came together from Charlotte, Seattle, San Juan, Fort Worth, Fort Lauderdale, San Diego, and Chicago to put this review together.